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10 Ways to Motivate Your Child to Learn

Posted on 4 November, 2015 at 20:40 Comments comments (0)
10 WAYS TO MOTIVATE YOUR CHILD TO LEARN
Inspire his/her thirst for knowledge inside and outside of school

If you want your child to be a stellar student, don't limit learning to the walls of his/her classroom. Although the skills they're learning there are crucial to their intellectual and social growth, your child needs your help to open up the world of ideas. His/her renewed joy in discovery will transfer to his/her school work, so you'll boost his academic achievement too!


1. Fill your child’s world with reading.

Take turns reading with your older child, or establish a family reading time when everyone reads his/her own book. Demonstrate how important reading is to you by filling your home with printed materials: novels, newspapers, even posters and placemats with words on them.

 

2. Encourage him/her to express his opinion, talk about his feelings, and make choices.

He/she can pick out a side dish to go with dinner and select his/her own extracurricular activities. Ask for his/her input on family decisions, and show that you value it.

 

3. Show enthusiasm for your child's interests and encourage him/her to explore subjects that fascinate him/her.

If he/she's a horse nut, offer him/her stories about riding or challenge him/her to find five facts about horses in the encyclopedia.

 

4. Provide him/her with play opportunities that support different kinds of learning styles — from listening and visual learning to sorting and sequencing.

Supplies that encourage open-ended play, such as blocks, will develop your child’s creative expression and problem-solving skills as he/she builds. They'll need lots of unstructured play time to explore them.

  

5. Point out the new things you learn with enthusiasm.

Discuss the different ways you find new information, whether you're looking for gardening tips on the Internet or taking a night class in American literature.

 

6. Ask about what he/she's learning in school, not about his/her grades or test scores.

Have him/her teach you what he/she learned in school today — putting the lesson into his/her own words will help him/her retain what he/she learned.

  

7. Help your child organize his/her school papers and assignments so he/she feels in control of his/her work

If his/her task seems too daunting, he/she'll spend more time worrying than learning. Check in with him/her regularly to make sure he/she's not feeling overloaded.

 

8. Celebrate achievements, no matter how small.

Completing a book report calls for a special treat; finishing a book allows your child an hour of video games. You'll offer positive reinforcement that will inspire him/her to keep learning and challenging himself/herself.


9. Focus on strengths, encouraging developing talents

Even if she/he didn't ace his/her math test, he/she may have written a good poem in English class. In addition to a workbook for math practice, give him/her a writing journal.

 

10. Turn everyday events into learning opportunities.

Encourage him/her to explore the world around him/her, asking questions and making connections.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Eye Level Math

Posted on 4 November, 2015 at 17:35 Comments comments (0)

Another blog by a mother who has her son enrolled in Eye Level Math


My son is enrolled in Eye Level's Math Program, and has been attending the once-a-week Math lesson for two months now. At each lesson he attends, he is basically exposed to two things: Basic Thinking Math and Critical Thinking Math. For about an hour or so, he would complete the tasks assigned to him for the day, under the close supervision of his academic coach Emily. During the one-on-one session with Emily, he reads the instructions in the booklet and asks for guidance when needed. Then Emily would tell my son what the key concept of the task is, and he would then attempt to do one question in front of Emily to make sure that he understands the concept.


Although this sounds like 'heavily-scaffolded' learning, unlike in a private tuition setting, Emily doesn't hover my son for the entire time that he's in class. She lets my son continue working on his tasks as she attends to other students in class, who may or may not be at the same level and standard as him. Together, everyone in class engages in their own self-directed learning.


The classroom setting: My son in class with his teacher and other students


The center's class ratio of teacher to student for the Math Program is 1:8, but at my son's timeslot, there's only 5 students including my son at one time. Which is great, I think, since there are not too many students to distract him, but enough to spur him on to sit down and concentrate, just like them. It's also good that some of the students are older, because he can learn from their example.


Attending Eye Level is proving to be extremely beneficial for me at home. My son is now able to sit down on his own to complete his work (he gets homework to revise the concepts he's learned at Eye level). He doesn't need me to 'help' him anymore, and is able to cancel out distractions from his siblings all by himself to complete his work.


My son completing his work at home. HURRAY for self-directed, independent learning.


Eye Level Math Program is designed to help students improve their mathematical thinking and problem solving skills by enabling them to master concepts each step of the way as they progress through the curriculum. For now, my son has got his numbers 1 to 110 all settled in terms of counting (in order and in tens), writing, ascending and descending orders and simple problem solving (involving counting) -- all in 2 months or 8 weeks. He's moving on to addition and subtraction this month, something which he is acquainted with but not fully mastered yet. I can't wait for Eye Level to extend this learning for him.


My son tells me.

My son tells me he enjoys Critical Thinking Math more because it is 'more fun and interesting'. For critical thinking, he gets his spatial sense, depth perception and problem-solving and reasoning skills developed -- using puzzles, blocks and shapes, as well as math games that are very well designed to engage young minds. 


A glimpse from the pages of one of the Critical Thinking Math booklets.


Eye Level got my son interested in Math, all thanks to the fact that the program is so thoughtfully designed to engage the students. I am happy that my son likes numbers and even finding it fun to count. It's time to embrace the new methods of Math learning with Eye Level, instead of the old traditional rote-learning approach.


Learning Math the Eye Level Way: Play Math Program

Posted on 29 September, 2015 at 2:55 Comments comments (0)

 

This is shared by one parent from Hong Kong ....


*****

My daughter attends Eye Level Play Math where she gets to experience mathematical concepts in a fun and engaging way. Play Math is a program especially tailored for ages 2 to 5 years old, and is aimed at laying the foundation for developing a preschooler's understanding in Math. The child learns how to sort, match, order, compare, classify and recognize patterns at Play Math. The child also learns about shapes, spatial sense, and counting numbers. 


The best part of Play Math is its 1:3 student-teacher ratio in a 1-hour lesson, which is done through storytelling and lots of sticker fun! In every lesson, my daugther receives an activity booklet which is filled with colorful illustrations that follow a story. Each booklet is designed to help her advance in her understanding of mathematical concepts, like correspondence, sorting and classifying, comparing and counting according to levels. Her starting point for the level was first determined using the Play Math Diagnostic Test which she did before the first lesson.

 

Here is a glimpse of what's in the activity booklet that she gets to do with her teacher at Eye Level Learning Center. She gets to bring her booklet home so we had a fun time doing it together. In this activity booklet, my daughter learned the numbers 1 to 3 through a circus story about unicycles, bicycles and tricycles. The booklet has very captivating illustrations to engage a preschooler. 


 

She also learned how to group her items, count them, and then put the corresponding number of stickers for the things that she counted. Her favorite part was to peel the stickers off and put them in the booklet.



Play Math also helps develop fine motor skils. This 'follow the circle to the square’ kind of activity appears several times in one booklet – this is to teach the child to read and write from left to right, help in hand-eye coordination and strengthen the finger muscles so she gets better control when writing her numbers. My daughter draws lines and strokes, which helps develop good hand-eye coordination and better control as she starts writing her numbers.



My daughter enjoys doing every booklet. She brings home the booklet after every lesson, and would sometimes erase them so she can do them again at home. That's how much she likes it!


I would say Eye Level Play Math is quite engaging and value for money (at $99 per month for 4 lessons). Apart from the small class size, the booklet itself is designed to keep the child engaged with its colorful illustrations, stories and activities. The child also brings the booklet home so she can revisit what she's learned from the week's lesson, thereby solidifying the learning and keeping the interest alive, at least till the next week where she gets to read another story, meet new characters and work on different activities.


Who would have thought we could learn Math this way? Thank you Eye Level Learning Center for this wonderful program. 

 


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